A Chorus in Miracles Soundtrack: A Musical Celebration of the 50th Ann -  Beyond Words Publishing

One of the primary lessons of a course in miracles instructs us “There is no world.” Just as Cobb and Mal experience reality in the deep netherworlds of their subconscious minds, we are alarmed at each turn by our own projections. “Inception” is the nifty trick of implanting an idea in an unconscious dreamer’s mind that the dreamer will carry into reality. In the film the dream-schemers are all well aware that if they don’t lucidly perform the steps of their preconceived agenda, they will be stalked and pummeled by the images their fear and anger have evoked. Indeed Cobb’s shadowy figure, his Jungian dark anima, Mal, seeks to down him in her own black hole and she works as any clever, ego-alien shadow worth her salt, to manipulate him to believe what she believes is real.

So here we are, Don Quixotes all, swaying with ucdm our swords out ready to strike at the false extensions of our own repressed emotion. Welcome to the dream world. We have journeyed far from our source, forgotten that life is a game, and have, with our own source-power made this video so real we need an ingenious glitch in the matrix to shake us free.

Yet like The Force Himself or Herself, (most likely Itself) we are geniuses all. We are all different aspects of God. Fallen, deluded, confused, no doubt, but our true Source isn’t concerned that we blame him. We made this messy world when we chose to step out of Eden. Adam fell asleep, it says in Genesis. It doesn’t say he woke up.

Our job is to accept it all, stop judging, stop spinning the projections, and reset the course (pun intended) aright. I believe we will. It’s time for a contagion of mutual inception-up and down the halls of time-let’s collectively wake up!

Deborah DeNicola’s spiritual memoir The Future That Brought Her Here; Memoir of a Call to Awaken, an Amazon.com Best Seller, was released in 2009 from Nicholas Hays/Ibis Press. She is the author of Where Divinity Begins (Alice James Books) and two award-winning chapbooks. DeNicola edited the anthology Orpheus & Company; Contemporary Poems on Greek Mythology from the University Press of New England. Among many awards, Deborah has received an NEA Fellowship. Her poetry is published widely in journals and online